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Pop-up: Morgan Parker

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When:November 9 @ 2:00 pm - 2:15 pm

Where:

Portland Art Museum
1219 SW Park Ave
Portland, OR 97205

Morgan Parker pops-up in the Portland Art Museum galleries. Parker is presenting two new books at the 2019 festival: her debut YA novel, Who Put This Song On?, and her newest poetry collection, Magical Negro.

Parker is paired with the artwork Why Wait Another Day to be Adorable? by Hank Willis Thomas; found in the Hank Willis Thomas special exhibit, on the 2nd floor of the Portland Art Museum. Please reference the Portland Art Museum Map to find this location.


About Who Put This Song On?: In the vein of powerful reads like The Hate U Give and Girl in Pieces, comes poet Morgan Parker’s pitch-perfect novel about a black teenage girl searching for her identity when the world around her views her depression as a lack of faith and blackness as something to be politely ignored.

Trapped in sunny, stifling, small-town suburbia, seventeen-year-old Morgan knows why she’s in therapy. She can’t count the number of times she’s been the only non-white person at the sleepover, been teased for her “weird” outfits, and been told she’s not “really” black. Also, she’s spent most of her summer crying in bed. So there’s that, too.

Lately, it feels like the whole world is listening to the same terrible track on repeat–and it’s telling them how to feel, who to vote for, what to believe. Morgan wonders, when can she turn this song off and begin living for herself?

Loosely based on her own teenage life and diaries, this incredible debut by award-winning poet Morgan Parker will make readers stand up and cheer for a girl brave enough to live life on her own terms–and for themselves.

About Magical Negro: A profound and deceptively funny exploration of Black American womanhood.

Magical Negro is an archive of black everydayness, a catalog of contemporary folk heroes, an ethnography of ancestral grief, and an inventory of figureheads, idioms, and customs. These American poems are both elegy and jive, joke and declaration, songs of congregation and self-conception. They connect themes of loneliness, displacement, grief, ancestral trauma, and objectification, while exploring and troubling tropes and stereotypes of Black Americans. Focused primarily on depictions of black womanhood alongside personal narratives, the collection tackles interior and exterior politics―of both the body and society, of both the individual and the collective experience. In Magical Negro, Parker creates a space of witness, of airing grievances, of pointing out patterns. In these poems are living documents, pleas, latent traumas, inside jokes, and unspoken anxieties situated as firmly in the past as in the present―timeless black melancholies and triumphs.