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Pop-up: Renée Watson

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When:November 9 @ 1:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Where:

Portland Art Museum
1219 SW Park Ave
Portland, OR 97205

Renée Watson pops-up in the Portland Art Museum galleries. Watson presents two new books at the 2019 festival: her YA novel, Watch Us Rise, and her newest middle grade book, Some Places More Than Others.

Watson is paired with the artwork The Oft Forgotten Black Flower Children of Harlem by Hank Willis Thomas; found in the Hank Willis Thomas special exhibit, on the 2nd floor of the Portland Art Museum. Please reference the Portland Art Museum Map to find this location.


About Watch Us Rise: Newbery Honor and Coretta Scott King Award-winning author Renée Watson teams up with poet Ellen Hagan in this YA feminist anthem about raising your voice.

Jasmine and Chelsea are best friends on a mission–they’re sick of the way women are treated even at their progressive NYC high school, so they decide to start a Women’s Rights Club. They post their work online–poems, essays, videos of Chelsea performing her poetry, and Jasmine’s response to the racial microaggressions she experiences–and soon they go viral. But with such positive support, the club is also targeted by trolls. When things escalate in real life, the principal shuts the club down. Not willing to be silenced, Jasmine and Chelsea will risk everything for their voices–and those of other young women–to be heard.
These two dynamic, creative young women stand up and speak out in a novel that features their compelling art and poetry along with powerful personal journeys that will inspire readers and budding poets, feminists, and activists.

About Some Places More Than Others: A heartwarming and inspiring middle-grade novel about finding deep roots and exploring the past, the present, and the places that make us who we are.

All Amara wants for her birthday is to visit her father’s family in New York City–Harlem, to be exact. She can’t wait to finally meet her Grandpa Earl and cousins in person, and to stay in the brownstone where her father grew up. Maybe this will help her understand her family–and herself–in new way.

But New York City is not exactly what Amara thought it would be. It’s crowded, with confusing subways, suffocating sidewalks, and her father is too busy with work to spend time with her and too angry to spend time with Grandpa Earl. As she explores, asks questions, and learns more and more about Harlem and about her father and his family history, she realizes how, in some ways more than others, she connects with him, her home, and her family.